Hollywood’s failed presence in Bollywood

In “Bollywood versus Hollywood”, Heather Tyrrell explains Hollywood’s attempt to become globalized. Its attempt was extremely unsuccessful when it tried to infiltrate Bollywood because the culture was already set in stone there.  The presence of Bollywood and the difference in their movies prevented American movies from having any sort of success.  This writing on globalization showed how hard it can be for something to become globalized.  Media and movies in this case had the task of assimilating American culture into a completely different Indian culture.  Nationalism had an obvious presence in this article “A recent Hindi film, Rock Dancer, starring Samantha Fox, British glamour model turned pop singer, singing all of her own songs in Hindi, received very little press attention and no commercial success” (Tyrrell, 376). The film bombed because the majority of the Hindi audience had never heard of Samantha Fox and thus were uninterested.  They only want to be entertained by people indigenous to their country .

Difference in culture is the most difficult blockade to surpass in order to globalize.  People within a community are often resistant to change, especially when that change is coming from outside of their group.  I, along with many other people in the United States do not have interest in seeing a three hour Hindi film that consists of some songs and a couple dances, just like the Hindi masses don’t want to watch an American action movie.  In Giddens’ talk about globalization, he defined it as “the intensification of worldwide social relations which link distant localities in such a way that local happenings are shaped by events occurring many miles away and vice versa” (Giddens, 64).  Giddens’ definition of globalization directly conflicts with the expansion of Hollywood into Bollywood and until one of the two movie cultures changes, Hollywood will not be totally globalized.  In reference to culture change, it is very difficult for that to happen.  Revolutions need to occur for change to happen and those don’t happen in an instant.  Also, India and America’s massive population make the odds of culture change even greater.  The globalization of Hollywood does not look to be coming in the near future.

3 thoughts on “Hollywood’s failed presence in Bollywood

  1. I did not read this particular article, but your blog does a good job of showing that “this writing on globalization showed how hard it can be for something to become globalized”.

    Your argument that individuals “only want to be entertained by people indigenous to their country” makes a lot of sense. Especially because it seems that often, individuals are attracted to what they can relate to and thus, want to watch other people that are most similar to them in some aspect.

    Another great point that you make is “the difference in culture is the most difficult blockade to surpass in order to globalize”. Do you think that in the future, say within the next eighty years, Hollywood will be completely globalized? Will we then be interested in watching international films?

    Like

  2. I did not read this article and I didn’t think I would be commenting on this article. “I, along with many other people in the United States do not have interest in seeing a three hour Hindi film that consists of some songs and a couple dances, just like the Hindi masses don’t want to watch an American action movie.” I believe that your statement gives the perfect example on why Hollywood hasn’t been able to become globalized.

    “Also, India and America’s massive population make the odds of culture change even greater. The globalization of Hollywood does not look to be coming in the near future.” Without a culture change like you said I agree Hollywood being global would not happen anytime soon. Is culture change the only way to make Hollywood become global?

    Like

  3. Like Amanda, I didn’t read this article either, but your post gave a great synopsis of it! I found your take to be very thought provoking. When you talked about how Indian people tend to “only want to be entertained by people indigenous to their country,” it made me think about how different American media culture is. Here, we have countless TV shows about foreigners living in America; not only are we fascinated by these shows, but we’re entertained by it. Take for example one of the most award winning movies ever, which was about Indian culture: “Slumdog Millionaire.” This movie chronicled the struggles of growing up in the slums of India, and Americans absolutely ate it up. How do you think globalization has impacted our media and film industries, and why haven’t they impacted the industries of other countries in the same way?

    Like

Comments are closed.