The NBA on a global scale

Sport is no different than other enterprise in the sense that its possibility to grow is endless. The NBA specifically, has grown from a small American sport, to the second most popular sport, behind only soccer, in the world. There are many reasons for this growth. Sport, more than most enterprises, has such a possibility to grow due to its simplicity and the fact that all cultures no matter where they are located or how advanced are, have always and will always participate in sport. The globalization of the NBA is due to a few key factors, most of which go deeper than the actual sport itself.

The NBA has globalized to an international enterprise since the league came to be. One aspect of this globalization I speak about in my paper is Yao Ming’s entrance into the league. When Yao Ming was Drafted number one overall in the 2002 NBA draft it was not as simple as him hoping on a plane to the United States. The Chinese government needed to determine if they would allow Ming to play in the United States. After months of negotiation, the Chinese Government decided to let Ming play for the Houston Rockets, however, they set forth a few rules. First, Ming had to pay Chinese taxes on whatever he made playing in the NBA and second, the Houston Rockets had to agree to train the members of Ming’s old team, the Shanghai Sharks, in an effort to improve the Chinese basketball scene, and third, some of Ming’s salary had to go to the Shanghai Sharks. This is one of the instances where the Globalization of the NBA transcended the game and entered into the world of politics. The NBA is more than a game. It is a way for some international players to come to America and make some great money. The possibilities the sport has are endless. David Stern, the pervious commissioner of the NBA was very focused on globalizing the NBA and making into an international brand which it is well on its way to becoming.

3 thoughts on “The NBA on a global scale

  1. Very interesting, while Association Football is full of teams at most maybe composed of a quarter of natives from their own countries at time in Europe. America is seeing a rise of foreign players in its secondary sports of Baseball and Basketball which are sports that have some reach around the world. Basketball is an Olympic Sport it has many people engaged in it worldwide, hell the Lithuanians are big players in FIBA. The US is the country that is biggest on Basketball the most an has the biggest, most competitive, and oldest national basketball association in the world. “One aspect of this globalization I speak about in my paper is Yao Ming’s entrance into the league. When Yao Ming was Drafted number one overall in the 2002 NBA draft it was not as simple as him hoping on a plane to the United States. ”
    The US has started to have players from Africa beyond one Chinese player. Focusing on other foreign players into the US is fine, but other nation’s basketball scenes are better points. Since, isn’t this where the game was globalized?

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  2. I find your topic to be extremely interesting. I feel like today the world is becoming unified through things that each citizen has in common, and sports are one of these things. Basketball is growing into a more widely played sport than soccer has in recent years. Like Tyler said “hell the Lithuanians are big players in FIBA.” There are great rivalries between European countries on the FIBA circuit like between Spain and Portugal. As you mentioned the Rockets had to train the Shanghai Sharks in order to improve the Chinese basketball circuit. Today some people have left the NBA to go and play in the Chinese league because of the money that is available there.

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  3. I think it is interesting how one of the key factors you raised on the globalization of the NBA was due to the politics. Centuries before us, sports were never about politics or money, it was about setting a dispute, enjoying the game, honoring your people or culture you originate from. I find the terms to bring Yao Ming to the rockets astonishing. Not only did part of Ming’s salary have to go to his old team in the Shanghai sharks, but the Houston rockets also had to agree to train members of Ming’s old team in order to improve their squad and bring more revenue to Shanghai. Anthony Giddens would direct our attention to the risk Ming was actually taking because upon arriving to the states he had no idea what he was signing up for and completely lied his trust in this abstract system of the NBA.

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